How to create a family friendly wildlife garden

I make no secret of the fact I love gardening and helping local wildlife in my garden. I love that we have hedgehogs, toads, frogs, newts, slow worms, butterflies, bats and bees in the old house garden. I do not use chemicals at all and always try to find other, organic ways to overcome pests or problems.


Many people ask me how I created my wildlife friendly garden. Well, I didn’t! We have only lived in the old house for less than 2 years but in that time we have enhanced a previously overgrown and dark space into the beautiful garden it is today. The wildlife was here already but I like to think we are encouraging more creatures to come and visit.
I thought I would share with you my top tips for creating a wildlife garden that is also child friendly.

1. Save Water

Add a water butt to your garden will help in times of dry weather. You can even add sprinklers to some which children will love playing in! Use this water to fill up the paddling pool but add a teaspoon of Milton for very young children as the rain water could be dirty.

Wildlife pond
The pond in the old house garden in April 2017.

2. Ponds

Wildlife gardens are best with a pond but these can be very dangerous for young children. I went to a neighbours recently and was dismayed to see that they had poured sand into their pond as they were worried for their toddler. Whilst I understand this, I could only think of all the damage they had done to the pond’s ecosystem! Instead cover existing ponds with a good quality mesh above the pond or, better still, fence off your pond AND add a mesh. In this way creatures can still access your pond BUT your child will be safe. When your child is older or with supervision, you will be amazed at what creatures you can see together. Ponds are good for children to learn about life cycles and to see many animals from their books. Ponds attract a multitude of different animals but do not add a pump as this will only cause problems for tadpoles and other small creatures. For this reason, I would not add fish either as they eat tadpoles.

Wildlife garden
All the little tadpoles!

3. No Chemicals

I do not use any chemicals. Nothing to kill aphids. Nothing to prevent rose rust. Nothing to kill the weeds in my lawn. You really don’t need them. Add ladybird houses and encourage other insects into the garden will help to beat the pests. Make sure the soil is healthy by adding home grown compost. I will talk about other ideas in another post such as how to get rid of aphids the organic way! Chemicals are not just harmful to the garden ecosystem but also for our families.

4. Plant some seeds and give a patch to your children.

Give a patch of garden to your children to grow their own seeds on. It could be a pot or raised bed if you have a smaller garden. Children love to plant, water and care for plants. They don’t mind what kind of plant it is! I love growing sunflowers, nasturtiums, marigolds, sweet peas and nigellas with children as they are all easy to grow from seeds. If you want to plant some now, I love nasturtiums. The seeds are larger for young children to handle and they grow quickly producing lots of lovely orange/red/yellow flowers. They have the added bonus of attracting the cabbage white butterfly so you may get caterpillars too!

5. Grow your own food.

There is nothing better than eating your own vegetables and fruits. It also helps children to see where their food comes from. You don’t need a garden to grow tomatoes; a window sill will do. You can buy small vegetable plants at this time of year which saves you growing from seed if you are a new gardener. We still do this sometimes as it saves space in the greenhouse! Easy vegetables to grow are cucumbers, peppers, peas, beans, onions, strawberries, carrots and pumpkins. I love growing pumpkins with children because they are always amazed at their size!

6. Feed the birds

We have lots of different bird feeders in the garden and even with cats, get lots of visitors. Children love to watch the birds that come to the garden. We always do the Big Garden Bird Watch in school and the children are ALWAYS thrilled to see all the different birds! You can make bird cakes with children which are very easy -put a hole in a yoghurt pot and add a piece of string (so that you can hang your feeder). Then, melt lard in a pan and add birdseed to it. Add the mixture to the yoghurt pot and leave to cool before hanging. Make a area of your garden for birds and you may be lucky to see other visitors such as squirrels!

7. Create a den or “hide”

Children love making dens so make a permanent one in the garden where your children can hide and watch the birds! You can use bamboo plants as they grow quickly (but can be invasive) or you could make one from willow sticks. Even adding a den from materials and chairs is a great way to encourage children to sit quietly to watch wildlife (for about 5 minutes!)

Wildlife
Hedgehog in the old house garden.

8. Add animal homes

Add nesting boxes, ladybird houses, bat boxes and hedgehog homes to encourage wildlife to stay. Making a bee hotel is always a fun project to do with children and they are easy to make. Get lots of plastic drinking straws and let your child bundle the straws together and tie them using string or an elastic band. Then cut the straws to the size they want (great for snipping skills!). Hang these on a sunny wall and watch the solitary bees come to make their nests. Perhaps read stories about the animals and this will enable your child to see what they may look like.

9. Plant food for the insects

Planting a range of plants that flower throughout the year not only makes your garden look good, it also provided food all year round for bees, moths and other insects. My favourites are lavender, forget-me-nots, primroses, buddleja, sedums, sunflowers, clover, honeysuckle, jasmine, asters, black eyed susan, phlox and crab apple blossoms. Variety is key and personally, I love the cottage garden look anyway!

10. Don’t be too tidy!

The perfect wildlife gardens are a little untidy in places and have patches of nettles or wild bits! It’s tricky to do this in a small garden but I tend to think that if the grass is a little long or if there a few weeds, it doesn’t really matter. Enjoyment of our green spaces is key so that we can spend as much time outside in the fresh air as we can. If we can do that and help local wildlife as well, surely we will all live in a better world and will be teaching our children than wildlife matters.
Happy gardening everyone!
OH THE JOYS OF LIVING IN THE OLD HOUSE IN THE SHIRES.

 

3 Little Buttons

31 Comments

  • ‘Don’t be too tidy,’ I think that is the essence of the perfect garden, isn’t it? Practical, well thought out points, Sophie. In my imagination all those flowers would make for a wonderfully pretty garden.

  • Hi, thanks for sharing some great tips on how to make a wildlife friendly garden. We have bird houses and an insect house. Our bird feeder also attracts the squirrels. The only downside is the burry their goodies in our lawn #MarvMondays

  • What a fantastic collection of ways to make a garden more engaging for children! We are constantly trying to improve ours (and fight against the ever-growing weeds), so I’ll certainly be baring these tips in mind, thank you 🙂 #MarvMondays

  • Great ideas. We’re still working on our garden and I’m hoping to have some large planters to use as pollinators and also to grow some fruit and veg in which the kids can get involved in! Thanks for linking for #marvmondays x

  • Lovely ideas, I think we try to do most of them and they are great for getting the kids outside and appreciating the natural world around them #marvmondays

  • What great ideas and lovely photos! Encouraging children to love gardening and nature is so important as they are tomorrow’s custodians of our beautiful planet. I think we are going to enjoy each other’s posts!

  • This is a great post! I’ve been thinking about getting a water butt lately, but our gardens quite small so we need to get a smallish one. We’ve been trying to do a bit to encourage wildlife in our garden, planting lots of bee friendly flowers & we made a bee hotel.

    • That sounds awesome Sarah. A water butt will always help with watering of any pots etc however small your garden is. Thank you for commenting. X

  • No chemical all the way! Didn’t think of collecting water. I will start that as we have had so much rain lately.
    #twinkletuesdays

  • My garden needs to be redone from top to bottom. I didn’t even know where to begin! Reading your post has provided me with tonnes of ideas! #twinkletuesdays

  • Love this post – we are about to move to our first house with a garden and it is a blank canvas to work on! Whilst I’m not a huge gardening lover, my parents love it so I’m hoping they can teach me and Alfie some things about creating a beautiful but child friendly garden!

  • I’m in the process of writing two posts in collaboration with Homebase & Mumsnet on this very subject! One is already live & the other is coming next week. Great tips #marvmondays

  • […] 1. Encourage wildlife that eat them! Make homes for hedgehogs, leave a wild patch, make homes for insects and make a hole in your fence so that hedgehogs can get in and out. See my post on how to create a wildlife garden Here […]

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