Giving Your Teenager The Best Chance Of Success At University

It’s always a sad moment when you have to say goodbye to your kids as they go off to university. But rather than dwelling on how much you’re going to miss them, a better way to use your energy might be to try and improve their chances of educational success by helping them along in whatever way you can. Certainly, they will be keen to be free of you to a certain extent, that is perfectly natural. But there are non-intrusive ways you can help them – both before they actually leave, and from afar once they have settled into their halls and started studying. Let’s look at some of the best things you can do here.

Preparation

Before they go, prepare your teenager by talking to them about what it might be like; they might experience loneliness or miss home  but this is normal. Encourage them to join in with lots of different activities to meet new people. Teach them a few recipes so that they can cook something! This will be so valuable when they are trying to budget. Show them how to do their laundry if they are not used to doing chores (they should be!) Listen to their worries or fears but explain that it is normal to feel this way.

Teach Them The Value Of Productivity

The more productive your child is at university, the more that they will be able to get out of the experience, no matter where their own personal skills might lie. If you can teach them the value of productivity, therefore, you will be helping them to get a much better degree, and get much more out of their experience at university on the whole as well. If you take a look at this article on How to Become a Productive Student, you will see that there are many behaviours and habits you can begin to encourage in your child in order to bring about a greater productivity in them. Get this just right, and you will be amazed at what it can really do for them.

Help Provide For Their Materials

There are always going to be a lot of materials which your child needs at university, and one great way to help them is to provide for these things in any way you can. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with a little financial aid, especially if you know that the money is most likely going towards books and other relevant materials. Just make sure that you allow them to also develop their own material independence, as otherwise it is unlikely that they will really learn anything of value about the nature of money. Help provide for them in whatever way you can, but leave them be to a certain extent too. Get this balance right, and it will really help them out.

Encourage Them From Afar

The more that you can provide encouragement, the more likely it is that they will be able to succeed in their university course. Different children need and want different amounts of encouragement, and it’s important to know your own child well enough to know what is actually right for them. Providing them with just the right kind and amount of encouragement might be the most important thing you do as a parent, so it’s worth not overlooking this vital step. Get it right, and they could see a huge difference in their results.

And what about us parents left behind? Well I’m sure many will experience empty nest syndrome whilst others will immediately book that faraway trip but here are some things that you shouldn’t do!

Giving your teenager the best chance at university. Oldhouseintheshires #parentingteenagers

 

Monday Stumble Linky
After The Playground

19 Comments

  • You are a little bit harsh of me here Sophie so it’s great to hear what to do! I still think I’d mecthe sort of mother who hides his car keys just as he’s about to leave though! X

  • Oh my goodness! Sorry for the writing mistakes. That’s predictatext for you. You are AHEAD of me not harsh!

    • Possibly harsh too! Haha.
      Love to you too! Xx

  • I am no where near Uni for my children, but great tips. I don’t think i could ever let my children go haha. #LGRTStumble.

  • I’m not sure whether I’m looking forward to this stage or not with my kids. I think the independence will be great for them but I will miss them terribly. I like how you talk about keeping up the encouraging communication, great for kids as they get older to know that once they’ve left home, you are still interested in their lives. #LGRTStumble

    • I know…it’s soon for mine so I’m not looking forward to it at all!

  • I definitely want to check out that how to be a productive student article. If there are things I can teach my son now that will help and guide him, then I’m all for it!

    #tweensteensbeyond

    • Yes, that’s great. I’m not sure if mine will go or not. We shall have to see. X

  • Ah thanks for linking to my posts! It is a really big moment for parents as well as the students. Definitely good to prepare so it is not such a shock when it happens! Thanks for sharing with us at #TweensTeensBeyond

    • Well I love your posts too so it seemed a sensible choice! Thanks for having me.

  • Oh Sophie, I thought I had prepared my son for so much but whatever you tell/teach them I have learnt from my first year as a university parent it is not enough and there is a post there!!! That first foray into freedom is a world of temptation and destruction. Of course there is a lot of good there too! Thanks for linking. #TweensTeensBeyond

    • You must write that post, jo! I’m not sure my daughter will go to uni but I’m sure my son will. He’s already delving into the world of temptation at 16 (next week) so I’m hoping he would have got it out of his system!

  • Wow, it almost brings a lump to my throat Sophie. Very useful ideas here and I’m sure you will have it all under wraps when the time comes. And yes to the communication. That’s the most important thing isn’t it. Thank goodness for phones. Makes me wonder whether parents ever heard from their kids pre-phone days!! Thanks for sharing with #tweensteensbeyond

    • Ah thanks Nicky! That so kind of you to say…and yes to phones!

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