#MyGloriousGardens September Round-up Post

Hello everyone!

This is the September Round-up of #MyGloriousGardens. What a busy month it has been in the old house! Back to school and work, my school had an inspection, my poor mum has been ill and we have been hard at work developing a new part of our garden which is almost ready to share with you! Phew….

This month we had 18 lovely linkers.  I will be sharing these posts on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Stumbleupon. I hope that this brings you more blogging love!

Not every linker is commenting on the other blogs so that is something that you may like to do in the next few weeks. Please don’t just link and run. It makes it easier if you could please add the #MyGloriousGardens tag after you comment so that bloggers can see where you came from. Thank you.

Now to the linkers:

Mudcakesandwine

A lovely post about adding annuals via seeds to a border. I think the author was disappointed but I think this border looks great and will possibly reseed itself for next year. A little bit of colour in a dull patch is always welcome! I’m sorry I couldn’t find your name on your blog but welcome to this little community of the blogging world! I hope you can return next month.

thenextbestthingtomummy

Karen posted 2 posts this month. She has worked in Early Years and posted a post about being a childminder as well as a post about The North Devon Mini-run. Thank you Karen for these posts and for linking again this month. I couldn’t find any share buttons on your posts Karen but I have put these on to Twitter and Stumbleupon.

allthingsspliced

Nicola shared a post about her lovely holiday in Cornwall in a caravan with her family. I loved the photographs in her post and it actually looked like she enjoyed good weather! They stopped off at Dyrham Park, one of my favourite places near me, to visit. Thank you Nicola for linking again this month.

Thomasstone.blog

Hello Thomas. Thomas is a regular linker and gives us gardeners lots of great advice! This month he talks about hedge trimming with practical tips and do’s and don’ts which has proved very useful in the old house garden. We have a large beech hedge which is now looking trim and neat!

Growingself

Hello Roda. I am an avid reader of Roda’s blog which is so uplifting and positive. This post is no exception. She always includes beautiful photographs to brighten the soul which you can also find on Instagram for further inspiration. Thank you Roda. I’m glad I was a post-it note reminder for September! Hope to see you again next month.

CandeloBlooms

Jane is a regular so welcome back Jane! I love the fact that Jane lives on the other side of the world so she is just approaching the excitement of Spring whilst we are heading into Autumn. It will be lovely to watch as her growing garden in months to come.

greenfingeredblog

Welcome to Paul as a new linker. Paul’s post is about a visit to a garden I don’t know about called, Kingston Maurward. You know me readers, I love a good garden visit as they were the inspiration behind #MyGloriousGardens. I love the way posts like this one enables us to take away inspiration for our own gardens and this one is no different. Do take a look. Thank you Paul for joining in with the Linky! I hope you pop back next month.

Mypottingbench

Welcome to Craig and his wonderful post on the amazing RHS Wisley. I haven’t been yet but this special garden is on my list! I love the Exotic Garden with its straight lines and central pond….glorious! Thank you for linking this month. We hope to see you again.

30daysofwildparenting

Joshua is a regular linker so thank you for linking this month! I love the way Joshua blogs about jobs that are easy for fellow gardeners to be getting on with and his shed is one such project. I hope to see you again next month.

offtheedgegardening

This is such a cute post about Gill having little helpers in her garden and the lovely nature collection they made into a piece of art. Lovely to have you with us this month, Gill. Hope to see you again.

Vegplotting

Michelle linked last month so thank you for linking again. In this post, Michelle talks about the fact that we can sometimes be too critical of our gardens when we really shouldn’t be! After all this rain, my garden is looking a little windswept but it is still glorious. I’m sure you garden is too. Michelle.

Watching the Daisies

Hello Brigid and thank you for linking again to #MyGloriousGardens. Brigid has linked 2 posts and I love them both. If I had to choose I would say I love seeing her own garden and the changes that the seasons bring. Thank you for linking this month and hope to see you in October.

dogwooddays

Nic was a first time linker so welcome! I loved this post about the benefits at this time of year of having a cutting patch. I must admit that I may have to do this for next year! I love all the colourful Gladioli and Bells of Ireland that Nic is now enjoying in vases in her house. Right…now where is that bulb catalogue? Hope to see you next month, Nic.

Urbanvegpatch

A lovely round-up post from Caro about her garden and its fruit and veg. Like all of us gardeners she is excited about planning for the spring with….seed catalogues! We all love them don’t we? Lovely photographs in this post too.

 

Well that’s all folks…..See you in October.

Just one teaser photo for you….I can’t keep it to myself anymore…..Our new rose garden…almost finished!

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The old house new rose garden
My Random Musings

10 Jobs for the Autumn Garden

The weather went from 26 degrees yesterday here in Wiltshire to a chilly 14 degrees today with lots of rain! It feels Autumnal already so I thought I would share with you some of the jobs that I plan to do in the next few months in the garden.

Here are my top 10 jobs for this busy season.

  1. Collect seeds. Collecting seeds to grow more lovely plants is a great way to save money and still have wonderfully full borders! My favourite seeds that need to be put away and sown in the Spring are; Cosmos, Sweet peas, Sunflowers, Marigolds, Zinnias and Poppies. My favourite seeds that can be sewn straight away as they need the cold weather to activate them are; Foxgloves, Yarrow, and Astrantia.
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Collect seeds in Autumn

 

2. Keep harvesting vegetables and sew some green winter manure plants now. Harvest fruits. Make apple juice from your apples or slice Bramley apples and freeze in bags to be used to make lovely apple crumble or apple pie.

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Harvest apples.

 

3. Rake and feed your lawn. Repair holes with grass seed.

4. Plant Spring bulbs. My favourites that I will planting this Autumn are snow drops, Fritillaria, daffodils and English bluebells.

5. Sort out your pond. Clean out any leaves and put up some netting to collect falling leaves. Amphibians such as frogs and newts will have left the pond to hibernate so this is a good time to do these jobs.

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6. Divide perennials and move any plants at this time. I don’t tend to tidy perennials now as I like to leave them for wildlife to feed on.

7. Make new compost bins for leaf litter. This makes a lovely compost.

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Leaves make lovely leaf mould that can be used on your plants in the Spring.

8. Clean out water butts and plan any hard landscaping ideas for the winter when plants are dormant.

9. Rake up leaves once a week so that the job doesn’t become too big.

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Rake leaves regularly to stop this job getting too huge!

10. Clear out summer bedding, add bone meal and feed to the soil giving it a good digging over before adding Winter bedding plants.

10 Jobs for the Autumn Garden

Lucy At Home

Monday Stumble Linky
3 Little Buttons

How to improve your soil with 5 common kitchen ingredients.

KI have written a post about how to make compost here

Not everyone has room in their garden for a compost bin so here are 5 common kitchen waste products that you can use to improve your soil and enjoy healthy plants.

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Add Eggshells to your soil.
  1. Egg shells
    • Dry the eggshells in a bowl on a sunny window sill. Once they are dry they crush really easily.
    • Crushed eggshells add extra drainage and calcium to your soil. I find they also prevent rot in tomato plants.
    • Work the crushed shell into the soil or add crushed shell to the base of plants to help deter snails and slugs. They don’t like the feel of the crushed shell so should avoid your young seedlings or plants. See my post about deterring these pests organically

here

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Add banana skins to your garden for improved drainage.

2. Banana skins

  • Adding cut up banana skins to your soil will help improve drainage as they encourage worms. They rot down quickly leaving lovely crumbly soil.
  • Banana skins add calcium, magnesium, sulphur, phosphorus, potassium and sodium to your soil which are needed for healthy plant growth.

3. Epsom Salts

  • Magnesium is incredibly low in many people’s diets and has been declining in our vegetables since the 1950’s. Magnesium is needed for enzyme reactions and is a basic requirement in maintaining healthy body functions. Adding Epsom salts to our soil where we grow vegetables will help this.
  • Add Epsom salts to the base of your vegetables; especially cabbages, broccoli, lettuce and peppers.
  • Add to your tomatoes for healthy fruits.
  • If your plant leaves are curly, it may be due to a magnesium deficiency so give Epsom salts a try.  Epsom salts can be added to the watering can too but make sure to water the base of your plants not their leaves.
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Coffee Grounds are great for Acid loving plants.

3. Coffee Grounds

  • I empty my coffee pods of their coffee grounds and add this to my compost bin. You can also add coffee grounds straight to the soil as a general fertiliser adding Nitrogen.
  • Coffee grounds are particularly good for acid loving plants such as Rhododendrons, Azaleas,  heathers and blueberries.
  • Coffee Grounds work very well as a mulch around plants. Earthworms love them but slugs don’t tend to.

5. Tea Bags

  • Snip open dried tea bags and use their contents in your garden.
  • Use them in the same way as coffee grounds to improve soil.
  • Pop them into your watering can and water the plants with your tea water.

There we have it! I hope you have found these tips useful.

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Pink Pear Bear
My Random Musings

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Lucy At Home

One Messy Mama
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https://www.adelightsomelife.com/2017/08/home-garden-thursday-87.html

Monday Stumble Linky

How to make fabulous household compost to use in your garden.

We have a compost bin in the old house and we use it make fabulous, organic compost to put on the garden. They add vital nutrients to the soil to enable optimum growing conditions.

What benefits does compost have to my garden?

Your own compost will feed and condition your garden soil and can also be used for your pots or in growing your  own vegetables. It also is a great way to recycle kitchen waste so leaving less to go in your rubbish bags.

What can I compost?

      • Vegetables and fruit peelings/cores/skins. Banana skins are ideal for the compost.
      • Grass cuttings. Try to mix this with “dry” bits so that the compost doesn’t get too slimy. I put leaves on another pile to make leaf mulch.
      • Dry bits like paper, newspaper and cardboard such as cereal boxes, loo rolls and packaging. I strip mine up so that they can compost quicker.
      • Tea bags and coffee grounds (also good for dealing with slugs see my post

    here

  • Animal bedding such as straw and sawdust from a rabbit hutch. This does take longer to compost though.
  • Egg shells. We eat a lot of eggs in the old house so I also crush these up to discourage those pesky slugs and snails!
  • Lint from the dryer or washing machine. Animal hair or hair from hair brushes.
  • Ash from my fire. Some don’t add this but we don’t have too much so it can go in!
  • Old cut flowers. I chop these up into smaller pieces.
  • I also add Epsom salts to my compost as we are low in Magnesium here in Wiltshire.

What do I not compost?

  • Any meat or fish. This can attract rats.
  • Animal faeces. Ugh!
  • Weeds. I don’t add these because I don’t want to add their seeds to my compost.
  • Cat litter.
  • Nappies.
  • Old dog or cat food.
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My compost -you can see the layers.

How do I compost?

You can buy some great compost bins from most garden centres or DIY shops. They are often large, black bin looking things with a removable front panel. Put this is a place in your garden that is out the way. It won’t smell but they are not great to look at! Make sure they are placed ON THE OPEN GROUND. This is vital. The bottom of the bin must be placed onto the soil so that worms can get in. The worms are what are going to be doing all the work for you as decomposers! Put in your waste as and when you have it. I mix my bin contents every now and again to get the air into the compost and to allow the wet and dry pieces to mix. You can make your own compost area too like we have in the old house garden.

In about 6-8 weeks you will have lovely, crumbly compost that you can out into your garden! Simple! You can even compost in a small garden.

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Hubbie built our compost bin from old scaffolding planks!

Have a go! You plants will thank you (and so will the bin man and the planet!)

OH THE JOYS OF LIVING IN THE OLD HOUSE IN THE SHIRES.

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Dottie & Primrose say hi. 🙂
My Random Musings
Cuddle Fairy

10 ways to deal with slugs and snails in the garden without using chemicals.

Snails and slugs have eaten my Delphiniums again! They have also munched some of my vegetables and it’s quite a problem!

We garden without chemicals in the old house garden. We have pets but we also have a resident hedgehog as well as slow worms, bats, pond life and birds. We want to encourage this wildlife and using chemicals is not an option. I also think that if you have young children you should think very carefully about using chemicals.

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Slugs and snails are a nuisance in the garden

So how do we deal with slugs and snails?

1. Encourage wildlife that eat them! Make homes for hedgehogs, leave a wild patch, make homes for insects and make a hole in your fence so that hedgehogs can get in and out. See my post on how to create a wildlife garden Here

2. Make sure your plants are as healthy as they can be. Use mulch, make your own compost and water your plants regularly (using water from your water butt of course!)

3. Make raised beds surrounded by gravel to make it trickier for the snails and slugs to reach your vegetables in the first place.

4. Make beer traps. Basically put some beer into a jar or pot. It needs to be deep enough so they can’t get out. Put this amongst your vegetables. The snails and slugs like the yeast in the beer and will choose this over your plants. Tip the snails and slugs in the compost bin.

5. Use crushed egg shells or crushed pistachio nuts around the base of your plants. They don’t like it all over them when they move.

6. Use coffee grounds, sawdust, ash or sand around the base of your delicate plants. I’ve actually never found these work but some people swear by them!

7. Put out strips of cardboard at night and in the morning, you will find the snails and slugs underneath and you can pop them into the compost, cardboard and all.

8. Smear petroleum jelly around the base of plants in pots. The snails and slugs can’t cross the jelly to reach your plants.

9. Plant “sacrifice” plants such as lettuces. In other words, the snails and slugs will eat these instead.

10. If in doubt, go out! I go out in the early evening (with a torch…..🤔) And pick off the slugs and snails. I then put them where the hedgehogs live or straight into the compost bin.

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You don’t need chemicals to deal with snails and slugs.

I hope this post was useful to you!

OH THE JOYS OF LIVING IN THE OLD HOUSE IN THE SHIRES

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